About your Search

20130106
20130114
STATION
CSPAN2 8
CNNW 5
CSPAN 5
MSNBCW 4
CNBC 3
CNN 2
FBC 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KNTV (NBC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WETA 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 40
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
ensure that rules are based on good data and sound science. third, we are going to see -- you're going to see a significant respond to expand the expertise of our law firm, the national chamber litigation center. and in other areas of our institution in order to deal with expanding regulation. our preference is always to work within the legislative and regulatory process. and we do that on a daily basis, but when rights have been trampled on, our regulators have overstepped their bounds, well, we will then just take necessary legal action. now let me turn to something we should all care about any very important way, that's immigration reform. america has grown because we have attracted and welcome some of the most talented and the hard-working citizens of the world to our shores. immigrants teach in our universities. they invest and invent in our technological companies. they staff our hospitals. they care for our elderly and our young. they harvest our food and they serve in our armed forces. given are changing demographics, we need more workers to sustain our economy. support our ret
is the continued united states pre-eminence, not just in demand space programs but in terms of science and inventions and everything else that goes along with it, and it ended up being washed away in the flood of stimulus france. as this hearing has highlighted already, the president's approach to human spaceflight lacks a clear mission and he is relying on the success of commercial space, which i agreed is vital that has dragged its feet and pushed its flight at nasa. i strongly support a public-private partnership for the country's space policy. however, it is up to nasa to develop the heavy lift rocket because the private sector doesn't have enough funds to do it by itself, and that heavy lift rocket needs enough thrust to overcome the administration shortsightedness. now why cancel inhofe, the international partners who supported the mission, president obama has taken a been there and done that approach but we haven't been there for 40 years and the international partners who would have helped us have never been there. if we cannot lead the world with space, china and russia will i
such as the red cross. even the science fiction story. what we're dealing here really when you come down it the oil industry in familiar grew up in almost completely isolation and this is virtually a unique case. we have other places where oil industry have gone grown up and run by national oil companies. almost in every case, in fact in every case, the industries were first founded by foreigners and then were taken over. not so in the case of russia where from the 19 20s rate on the oil industry was home grown and developed the own culture and civilization even as the soviet union did with the own language and culture. i sometimes like to tell my classes that the story of russia in the 20th century is very much that have a people who decided that capitalism didn't work. so it's though they are piled in to a space capsule and took off and landed on the planet mars and started a different civilization which the market was thrown out in prices and private ownership and built that civilization and made it run for nearly six or seven decades, not well, but it ran. then they decided it wasn't
cross. this was profitable and, therefore, of interest. it's even a science fiction story, because what we're doing here really when you come right down to it is the meeting of two alien civilizations after 70 years of the soviet period. the oil industry, in particular, grew up in almost complete isolation from the waste, and this is virtually a unique place. we have other places where oil industries are run by national oil companies, but in almost every case -- in fact, in every case, these industries were first founded by foreigners and then were taken over. not so in the case of russia where from the 1920s on at any rate for all practical purposes the oil industry was home grown and developed its own culture, its own civilization even as the soviet union did with its own language and its own culture. i sometimes like to tell my classes that the story of russia in the 20th century is very much that of a people that decided that capitalism didn't work, so it's as though they all piled into a space capsule and took off and landed on the planet mars and started a completely different civ
'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. spending the day with my niece. i don't use super poligrip for hold because my dentures fit well. before those little pieces would get in between my dentures and my gum and it was uncomfortable. even well-fitting dentures let in food particles. super poligrip is zinc free. with just a few dabs, it's clinically proven to seal out more food particles so you're more comfortable and confident while you eat. so it's not about keeping my dentures in, it's about keeping the food particles out. [ charlie ] try zinc free super poligrip. trying to find a better job can likbe frustrating.gs, so at university of phoenix we're workinwith a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum, so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work. >>> the u.s. military has a
exploitation, spreading its roots in science and technology around the world. and he had enemies here. his enemies with the southern segregation. the anti-imperialists, and the conservatives who said american fascists are those people who think wall street -- so he had enemies and those enemies want to get rid of him on the ticket in 1944. the big problem was he was enormously popular. on july 20, 1944, the night the convention starts in chicago, potential voters who they want to run on vice president dick 65% said they wanted wallace on the ticket or 2% said they wanted harry truman. the question was how was the party bosses going to support. roosevelt was very feeble. when party bosses are to come to them and they want to get wallace off the ticket, roosevelt says to him, i support wallace but i can't fight this campaign myself. i'm not strong enough again. i am depending on you guys to do it. finally, caved in. his family was furious. eleanor roosevelt was furious with them. every one of the rows of kids was furious with them. they were huge wallace supporters. he had all the black dele
is a big deal. getting the kids in school today studying the sciences and technology and engineering and the math to stay in this country and getting a path to his citizenship and dealing with the competencies' to grow jobs. if you can deal with those issues, we would be off to a great start. >> you have many of your clients in the manufacturing business. looking at the broader economic shift, what do you do in a post- manufacturing world to provide the numbers of jobs that america needs? because it does not appear clear yet. >> we have roughly 12 million jobs through the great recession lost. we have filled about half of those. it will still take some more between five-seven years to get unemployment down to the 5% range. and you are right, the skill sets are starting to move. it will have to be able to move with that prepared the first that -- we will have to be able to move with that. the first up is immigration reform and job training. >> you are a guide in ohio and you have lost your job at a car plant and you are 55 years old. immigration reform will not help you much, is it? >
and you can't have those unless you're involved early in science. we developed models where we are integrated into the ecosystems around the world. i was at stanford this morning where the biggest life sciences employer in boston, we have a strong hub in china and in europe. and we are really trying to develop a collaborative open innovative concept. what we put in has to have a strong proof of concept. on vaccines, on drugs that have a clear benefit over existing therapies. because the bar just gets higher and higher from reimbursement authorities every year. >> sure. and does that include transactions -- more transactions in terms of mna? you know, some of your growth has come through acquisitions. going forward in the next three years, does that growth continue to come through acquisitions or organic? >> i think it's going to be more organic. i'll tell you. in our industry, everybody's got a lot of cash. everybody is interested in growing inorganically. it's tough to find deals that have value. because sanofi now grows we have less than 3% subject to small molecule patents e
has been to china many times knows his markets and political science has told us china was way too restrictive in the monetary policy, that somehow the communist party got caught up on worrying about inflation, not worrying about growth. come on, malice, be like mal for heaven sake. i think they're still going with the techs, though. that's over. klaus is confident that when the dpovt unveils the plan for growth in february, they're going to dazzle, from a disappointing 8% to a stunning 11%. there's plenty to like if china gets ho the t in here and takin all its clothes, that's ray lewis. the chinese are addicted to coal. and we know electric uses have gotten stronger and stronger as the year's gone on. got that data. although joy's up about 10% in two weeks. you can look at truck manufacturers as the chinese are back with a vengeance. but i don't know, i don't want to outthink this. the best way to play china is china, specifically the etf for the biggest chinese stocks i've steered you away from owning individual stocks except for brief flirtation with baydu. nevertheless, call m
to the school as word of the shooting spread. officials say a male student walked into a science classroom and shot a 16-year-old boy. witnesses say he tried to shoot another classmate but missed. a teacher managed to talk the shooter into surrendering. >> i want to commend the teacher. he saved many lives today. his actions, his ability of what he did to protect the students there. >> maw medics airlifted airlifted the -- paramedics airlifted the by the day. vice president joe biden gun violence task force, the face to face between the vice president and the nra. >> reporter: vice president joe biden says he will have a list of proposals to help reduce gun violence ready for president obama by tuesday. >> a surprising reoccurrence of suggestions. >> reporter: he is focused on the types of weapons. also, a ban of high capacity gun clips and closing the gun show loophole. they are looking for proposals and may try executive action. >> through executive action it is tough for the white house to make that much of a difference or not going to ban the sale of certain ammunition or weapons. >> r
for information and open science good, i don't see how this can be harmful. when we tell north koreans -- i've been dealing with them for years, what they are doing is heading toward a path toward confrontation against their own interests. against their own economic growth by spending so much on nuclear weapons, on missile tests, that's the message that they receive, and maybe we'll do some good, maybe not. and then there is the american there. >> you didn't get a chance to meet with kenneth bay. his son had written a letter, that he was hopeful you would deliver to his father. what happened on that front? >> the letter will be delivered. kenneth bay is way up in the northern part of the country. not accessible to us. but we made the point very strongly that he should be treated properly. we were assured that the judicial proceedings on his case would happen soon. that's sometimes a good sign, because it means it may be wrapping up and hopefully he'll be released. nobody had been -- we have a swedish representative there. we don't have representatives in north korea, advocating for him. thi
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> good morning, "varney & company," viewers. today is monday, january 7th and gerard depardieu, well, he's welcomed to russia with open arms and here, we're going to welcome with you open arms, with sandra smith and on the floor of the new york stock exchange, of course, nicole petallides. hey, you remember the cash for clunkers, that 2009 government program that gave people money, a the lot of money to buy more fuel efficient cars if they traded in the old gas guzzlers, as it turns out the program was actually bad, i'm saying bad for the environment. those engines from the gas guzzlers had to be shredded instead of recycled and the process was not very green. sandra, can you say you're surprised for this. >> it forced people to turn in cars in some cases had perfectly good engines and perfectly good running cars and charles, this goes to every story we've seen the government try to intervene and push something that actually isn't needed in this country. cash for clunkers, it turns out, was
science visits to the moon, clearly, we are the leaders of lunar knowledge . we should be the leader of the international nations that come together regardless of whether we choose to send government people back there, once the government gets a program going, it is rather hard to cancel it, put in a sunset clause to humans going back to the moon. that probably wouldn't sit too well. but i think this administration has charted a course that is beyond government people back to the moon. we can do commercial things, looking for ice water, separating that in to hydrogen oxygen which is rocket fuel we can be the ones, the united states, that brings together other nations to invest in an ongoing transportation system . understanding and becoming leaders and experts in space transportation is where we should direct our efforts. well, he's quite the visionary. you can go to act apollo.comto enter into the contest. they have had over 200 flights and charging $100,000 for each flight. but the 22 lucky winners get to go for free. that is an adventure of a lifetime. it dad's show and he was ups
science, farm law and more. 21-year-old adrian bradley means an ag degree means good pay even for entry level jobs. >> my best friend just started at $48,000 a year in agriculture in agribusiness. >> experts predict by 2050 the world's population will exceed 9 billion people. a sobering projection that calls for boosting global food production by 70%. agriculture leaders say today's current crop of ag students are driven by that challenge. in davis, california, claudia cowen, fox news. >> thousands of faithful christians filling the streets of ma tried, celebrating the traditional end to the christmas season. beautifully decorated floats, clowns and marching bands took to the parades. it is held to celebrate the story of the three wise men who are believed to have followed a star to arrive at the manger in legitimate -- bethlehem where jesus was born. >>> why is this man strapped to his chair at 35,000 feet with duct tape? details next. i'm done! "are you a cool mom?" i'm gonna find out. [ female announcer ] swiffer wetjet's pads are better than ever. now they have the scrubbing power o
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. for their "destination wedding." double miles you can "actually" use. but with those single mile travel cards... [ bridesmaid ] blacked out... but i'm a bridesmaid. oh! "x" marks the spot she'll never sit. but i bought a dress! a toast... ...to the capital one venture card. fly any airline, any flight, anytime. double miles you can actually use. what a coincidence? what's in your wallet? [ all screaming ] watch the elbows ladies. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just have to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male anno
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "morning joe." the co-founders of a small business, their 3-year-old small business on the rise growing at a rate of 200% each year. >> that's good. a good rate of growth. good to see you. first things first, a new father, paul. congratulations. new year's eve baby. >> seven minutes before the ball dropped. snow maybe there >> how much sleep have you gotten zblnt maybe there's a reason you're here and not with the baby. we want to bring you guys in, you have first such a great story in school together and also facing the headwinds a lot of people have faced the last few years with the economy and succeeding. paul, i start with you. how did you guys get together on this and why did you choose shirts? >> a great question. we weren't always shirt makers. we were in business school in 2007 in the uk and we were heading to world finance in 2007, seemed to be the direction to go. as luck would have it and life have it we graduated the da
: lawrence is a professor of forensic science. cyanide is not easily detected on drug skreengs and a small amount can kill someone. >> it's usually kept under lock and key. again, if you work in the photographic industry, if you worked in a metal processing plant, or you worked in a plant with -- where they work with insecticides, those are places you would find cyanide. >> reporter: soits not all that difficult to obtain? >> it's not that difficult. if somebody wants to get it, they can get it. >> the only thing the chicago police would say on record is they are investigating khan's death as a murder and working closely with the medical examiner. as for the lottery check that had been mailed out, an official with the illinois lottery says records show that the check was cashed several weeks after khan's death. wolf? >> mary snow, thanks very much. >>> and you're in "the situation room." happening right now, tens and thousands of lives potentially at risk in what could be the worst flu season here in the united states in years. a leading doctor tells me, though, it's not too late to protec
was an editor, what they call an acquiring nature. worked in social science and history for a number of years and became executive editor and editor-in-chief of perhaps two different directors. c-span: what did you learn in that job that you applied to your book on teddy roosevelt or harry truman? >> guest: well first of all you learned something about writing. i read hundreds of manuscripts over the years. you learned what is good writing and what is not good writing. i was very particular. if even plus a famous author submitted i would turn it down or i would say get yourself an editor and rewrite this. it's an interesting story whatever it was and of course i made a few enemies by doing that. and then there were the authors who wrote like a dream, and i loved publishing them. i have also instituted a very large translation program at harvard when i had the power to do this. we probably published the most important history books coming out of france over a 10 or 12 years period. with the french were writing about was what they called the history over four or 500 years, not the history of 10
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's so great to see you. you, too! oh, cloudy glasses. you didn't have to come over! actually, honey, i think i did... oh? you did? whoa, ladies, easy. hi. cascade kitchen counselor. we can help avoid this with cascade complete pacs. see, over time, cascade complete pacs fight film buildup two times better than finish quantum. to help leave glasses sparkling shiny! too bad it doesn't work on windows. okay, i'm outta here. cascade. the clear choice. >>> programing note. there is no bigger, bolder, or less apologetic advocate of gun control in the entire country than new york city mayor michael bloomberg. he is also really hard to book for an interview. but mayor bloomberg is going to be our guest here on this show on monday night. the politics of gun reform have never been more promising in this country in modern times, and he is the most aggressive, most strategic proponent of that reform in the whole country, and he is here with us monday night. i hope you will watch. [
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. why let constipation stry miralax.? mirlax works differently than other laxatives. it draws water into your colon to unblock your system naturally. don't wait to feel great. miralax. >>> before the president can deliver his annual state of the union address to congress, he has to get invited to congress by congress. and today president obama got his invite from house speaker john boehner. so now we can all mark our calendars. february 12th, that's when we'll get to see president obama's first state of the union of his second term. what does he want to happen in the second term? how does he plan to get it done? we already had a bit of a preview last week once the fight over the bush tax cuts deal was finished, the president gave a speech in which he laid out five issues he said he was ready to move on with the new congress. the first is ending the war in afghanistan. we found out today how the president plans to move forward on that plan with a surprise announcemen
picture arts and sciences, and for us. he's welcome brian rose. rose.ase welcome brian [applause]next, we could not be more honored or delighted to have brooke gladstone with us tonight. she is the cohost of npr's "on the media." it also wrote a very entertaining book called "the influencing machine." we will be doing a signing of her book, it's just came out. she has been at npr for many years. including a three-year stint in moscow where she covered the last years of president boris yeltsin's term. i know that all of you diehard o the media" groupies will tell you that there is something about brooke that pulls you in. ira glass, host of this american life, put it right when he wrote, just like welcome gladwell, michael pollan, and michael lewis, brooke can take any subject, even something you do not give a damn about, and make it of interest. please welcome two-time peabody award winner brooke gladstone. [applause]>> thank you, catherine. thank you, brooke, for coming tonight. i would like to start with your book. you talk about a number of media biases. one of favorites is the narrat
actors guild, the producers guild, the academy of motion picture arts and sciences. please welcome brian rose. [applause] next, but could not be more delighted to have brooke gladstone here tonight. she is the managing editor and co-host of npr's "on the media" and author of a highly acclaimed book "the influencing machine.:" " we will be doing a signing of her book. she has been at npr for many years, including a three-year stint in moscow where she covered the last turbinate years of president yeltsin. i know all of you die hard groupies out there will agree there is something about brooke that pulls you in. each week, even at 7:00 a.m. on saturday, i think i -- the host of this american life put it right when he wrote -- just like malcolm glad well and michael lewis, brooke can take any subject, even something you deny give a dam about, and make a very interesting -- you don't give a damn about, and make it very interesting. please welcome brooke gladstone. [applause] >> thank you for coming tonight. i will like to start with your book. you talk about a number of media bias is. one of
shell for being willing to cooperate on getting to the science. but as i told marvin before we stepped out onstage, in colorado, you know, just repeatedly now, shell has been there calling for stronger regulations of its own industry, agreeing with e.d.f. on how to go forward in a way that really is very meritorious. so i just want to thank you, marvin, for what shell is doing on this topic. [applause] >> you mentioned the -- that there would need to be a mix of energy. you mentioned nuclear. is there a danger that the extraordinary growth of unconventional gas and oil in america creates a sense of abundance and no longer a need to worry about renewables that marvin talked about, and nuclear, for example? >> it's certainly having an impact on investment and research and development, there's no question about it. it has slowed down. we were something like 17 nuclear reactors being considered just to keep us at 20%. nuclear is 20% of our world power mix today and that's backed off. we have four being built in the country. but you see that happening. the thing we have to worry about, agai
to the customer through actuarial science and through claims management. our new role is to create an integrated delivery model driven by primary care providers that uses shared data at the point of care to improve outcomes, lower costs and create a better health care experience. at humana, our model integrates our delivery, data support for clip in additions -- clinicians and wellness and productivity platforms. and in many ways our motto is an evolution with its roots prevalent 20 or 30 years ago. but today simplicity is the key. we believe in integrated delivery model that emphasizes primary care can provide outcomes, lower the cost of care -- especially to patients with critical or complex medical needs, including patients in the medicare and medicaid program. the concept relies on primary care physicians to coordinate care for patients, helping them navigate the health care system so they can receive the right care at the right place at the right time. like many organizations and industries, technology plays such an important role in enabling this to happen. we are investing in today in dat
to shine is the smoked pulled pork. i think it's done broseph! pretty much got it down to a science... pretty much. we also really like a great pulled pork sandwich even when we can't make the game. you ruined it! some people even like it better. really? yep. [ male announcer ] new carving board pulled pork, get that delicious slow smoked taste without the hassle. it's game time food. >>> good morning, everybody. i'm jon kelley. this morning san francisco police continue the search for a man wanted for dousing his girlfriend with gasoline and setting her on fire. they say 22-year-old dexter oliver attacked her yesterday afternoon near the intersection of hollister and jennings in the city's bay view district. 25-year-old star lamar now in critical condition in the burn unit at st. francis hospital. she has severe burns to her face and her chest. family members say oliver became enraged when lamar told him their relationship was over. >> saw him pour gasoline in a bottle and he left. i didn't know he was going to burn her. >> police say oliver is 5'10", 155 pounds and has a haircut w
will also add to that that establishing cause and effect is what everybody wants in medicine and science, but it can take a long time to get that sort of data. what we're talking about here, wolf, so still a relatively new science. it's still emerging. 35 football players that have been examined at one particular laboratory in boston, of them, 34 did have evidence of this cte. but keep in mind, wolf, that these were also players that for one reason or another, their brains were being studied. so there was already some concern. it's going to take more study to sort of establish that connection, but one thing the researchers did tell me is that cte, they have not found anything else that causes it, except for repeated blows to the head. and by the way, not just concussions, wolf, but even what are known as sub-concussive hits. the kind of player where you see a player take a hit, but they get right back up, seemingly nothing wrong, those can accumulate according to some of these researchers and cause some of these problems later on down the line. >> which players, sanjay, are at the highes
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ ashley: fox business break, markets continuing the downward trend ahead of the start of the earning season kicking off tomorrow with aluminum giant due out after the closing bell. right now, a lot of red arrows on the screen. dow off by 55 or 56 points. businesses, meantime, feeling jolly over the holidays, and challenging a gray christmas saying hiring hit a six year high despite uncertainty regarding taxes and spending. the out placement firm says retailers boosted papers more than 10% from 2011. according to the consumer electronics association, global spending on electronics rise 4% this year to $1.1 trillion. the forecast in tablets and smart phone account for 40% of all global spending on glajs. that is the latest from the fox business network giving you the power to prosper. ♪ lori: oil trading tight range today, but how pretty close to the $93 barrel mark, fox business contributor, phil flip in the pits of the cme to update us on what's moving oil tread and what to expect for the week. phil? >> a nice pop here today, a w
, the bringing of science and technology. you're a world bank guy. you went to harvard and did a special the insight technology. so here we are, this tremendous knowledge in these fields. well, we talk about how they democracies, how do you see that from not only education, at full ride scholarships? that's ours but there are others whether it's french, canadians, the brits. so there are other ways for education, the empowerment of women and racial status inclusion, the international or american bar society helping with institutions. what do you think about that? or is it such that unless you're big much to that unless you big muscular defense, big muscular foreign aid, og, america is trying to toy with income and so is the west. i don't think america will ever be when be in anything, but i'm more of an additional school of thought. what do you think? >> thank you spent what would help colombia and help colombia in what would have latin america? >> thank you. certainly i can tell that the u.s. support and to speak very frankly on what you have request, the u.s. support on law enforcement
. but what do we learn from mummies? >> it's amazing. through modern science tools, we're able to learn about ancient people's civilizations. when people see mummies, who are they, where do they come from. it's a story waiting to be told. we are able to tell the age, the sex, how they lived, how they died. it's really an amazing exhibition. unlike hollywood myth, these mummies won't come out and get you. in fact they're awesome. just a breathtaking exhibition. >> that's what you say. what's your favorite? >> well, we have the youngest infant ever on display. a 6420-year-old infant radio carbon dating, $3,000 older than king tut. and what's interesting about this, it's a natural or what you would call accidental mummy from peru. such a beautiful, beautiful specimen, still has all of its hair, its facial expressions, it toenail, fingernails. very popular mummy. we also have the votch family, a mother, father and son. these mummies were found in a church in budapest during 18th century. the town was decimated in the white plague. the church floor boards popped occupy and due to the cool dry area
pain and feel better. all right. let's talk a little bit about the science of why it actually works. can you help me with that? absolutely. here we are. ok. all right folks. now. let me get over here. so what does compression do? let's take a look. it forces pressure up against that leg and it does several things. it actually increases blood flow in the arteries, allowing blood to get further up quicker back into the heart. and that's the beauty of this modality of treatment called compression. now that's the explanation of how compression works from a medical doctor. now let's hear from a doctor who actually uses tommie copper for himself. he's a 72 year old neurosurgeon, who just happens to be, you ready for this? an iron man athlete. take a look at this. hi, i'm joe maroon. i'm a neurosurgeon and i just finished the half iron man triathlon race in muncie indiana. for the first time, i wore the compression on my knee and the undergarments, and i have to say, i finished my best race ever at age 72. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome iron man triathlete, dr. joseph maroon. welcome
and upcoming spending debate, there are more than 200 science technology, engineering, and math programs in the federal government. 13 agencies spent 3.1 billion per year, and a third of those were added between 2005-2010. to us, that is real waste. maybe the objective is appropriate. the problem for the pentagon is they do a pretty good job defending the country. they did not do a good job of keeping track of where the money has been spent. to say they lost 2.3 trillion means they did not have an audit to show exactly where all of the money is spent. host: to finish up with the fiscal cliff. "washington times" has two headlines -- what are you watching for the next couple of months? guest: i think taxes are off the table. certainly the house will not both more taxes to deal with the sequester, which is all about spending cuts or its deal with the continuing resolution, which is also spending. the last time they held it up in order to get spending cuts, and now we find them delayed. i think they have this -- they have a pretty strong position, and people around the country understand the
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> gretchen: big thanks to united airlines. they fly the family around. how people get involved? >> go to the web site, march for babies.org and get involved. >> gretchen: see you tomorrow. bill: nice job. good morning, everybody. fox news alert. what will be a bruising new fight over the nominations for president obama's new national security team. on the left, former senator chuck hagel if, the president's expected pick for defense secretary. he is facing critics that say he is anti-israel and too soft on iran on. on the right, john brennan, the counterterroism advisor, expected to head the cia he also comes along with some controversy. good morning everybody. huge welcome back to my partner in crime. martha: did you miss me? bill: tirelessly so. martha: good morning. happy new year. bill: back to reality. martha: back to reality. had a wonderful time. very good to be back. happy new year to you. to everybody at home. good morning. this is obviously
of everything, medicine, technology, science of every kind. no world war iii. something worked pretty well. they did something else that was particularly important. they built coalitions of common interest. i will come back to that. what they recognize, if we were to avert another 50 years like the world had been through the first of jeers and we were going to have to define relationships not by our differences but by our common interests. only then could we build foundations and mutual trust our mutual common interest in order to deal with the differences. you cannot start with the differences. it is a long time to figure that out. they did have it figured out. i will come back to that. i think it is particularly relevant today. what he said about civilizations was very instructive. he said civilizations' are movements. they're not conditions. they are journeys, and not harbors. he said the civilizations died. he chronicles 24 civilizations that have died. civilizations die from suicide, not for murder. when we think of the world today in the threat to mankind today, we're certainly capab
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)